BUYING A GUINEA PIG? HERE ARE FIVE THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND.

BUYING A GUINEA PIG? HERE ARE FIVE THINGS TO KEEP IN MIND.

October 06, 2020

Original article by Versele-Laga.com

1. BUYING A GUINEA PIG? BETTER TO GET TWO!

Guinea pigs are social animals that live together in groups in the wild. In other words, when alone in a cage, a guinea pig becomes unhappy and withers away, unlike a Syrian hamster. So always have a buddy! Two bores or two sows can usually live together perfectly.

 

2. GET THESE NECESSARY SUPPLIES

When it comes to food, you only need a feeding bowl and a drinking bottle. You can also put water in a heavy earthenware bowl. Be sure to buy food that is specially-made for your guinea pig: this is the only way to ensure that your fluffy cutie pies get all the necessary nutrients (including vitamin C).

 

3. NOT EVERY GUINEA PIG LIKES TO CUDDLE

Sure, most guinea pigs are friendly and pleasant to deal with. But each also has its own character. There are smart guinea pigs, guinea pigs that go hog wild, calm guinea pigs, sweet guinea pigs, surly guinea pigs, you name it. As such, it is entirely possible that you could end up with a guinea pig that isn't into snuggling.
Regardless, be careful when handling a guinea pig. They are, in the literal sense of the word, very breakable. If they fall - even from a sofa - they may break a leg, rib or back.
GUINEA PIGS ARE SOCIAL ANIMALS THAT LIVE TOGETHER IN GROUPS IN THE WILD. IN OTHER WORDS, WHEN ALONE IN A CAGE, A GUINEA PIG BECOMES UNHAPPY AND WITHERS AWAY

4. GUINEA PIGS LIKE TO LIVE SPACIOUSLY

Especially when young, guinea pigs can be surprisingly active. It is therefore important to buy a roomy cage, in which it can play and horse around. Follow our tips for buying an ideal cage. Also, get a wooden house for it so your furry friends can laze about or sleep...or gnaw on it to grind down their ever-growing teeth.

 

5. FIND A GOOD VET AHEAD OF TIME

Sooner or later you'll have to take a visit to the vet with your guinea pig. Diarrhea, abscesses, dental problems, cutting nails ... Choose a vet in advance, someone who has a thorough knowledge of guinea pigs. Most vets specialize in cats and dogs. There is no separate training for rodents, but experience is a good teacher.